Podcast Episode 8: Coaching from the bottom up with Giovanni Guidetti

The focus of this episode of the podcast is on managing our team. It starts off with comments from Giovanni Guidetti’s interview where he talks about the importance of how you deal with the players on the bottom end of your roster. Our conversation expands the theme to how we should manage our relationships with everyone involved in our teams and organizations.

Giovanni Guidetti is currently the head coach of the Dutch women’s national team and of the Vakifbank club in Turkey. Internationally, he also coached for Germany and Bulgaria. At the club level, he has won two CEV Champions League titles (plus a runner-up) and has won gold and silver at the World Club Championships. In his native Italy, he was twice named Coach of the Year.

Feedback, questions, comments, etc. are always welcome!

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Iradge Ahrabi-Fard

Volleyball Coach and Researcher

Iranian Iradge Ahrabi-Fard started his career in his native land, but rose to international prominence while coaching in the US. As a professor of physical education, he has helped link coaching with research. He has published numerous volleyball coaching related articles.

His resume includes:

  • Member of the inaugural class of AVCA Hall of Fame inductees
  • Over 500 NCAA Division I victories in 19 seasons
  • 1999 AVCA Division I National Coach of the Year
  • 1997 AVCA Excellence in Education Award winner
  • Consultant and coach for USA Volleyball

Here’s some of what Iradge discusses in his interview:

– Adapting what you learn to your own coaching

– The importance of proper rest/recovery for athletes

– Coaching across different cultures (and sports)

– Being a professor and a coach

– A number of research observations

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Iradge’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Watching yourself coach

Terry Pettit, who we have on our list of Wizards to interview (he’s agreed, we just haven’t yet set the date) recently did an interview with fellow Wizard Mick Haley. One of the more interesting comments Mick made had to do with observations his wife has made about his posture when coaching. Specifically, he said:

Mick Haley“She tells me not to cross my arms on the bench because it makes me look anxious.”

By now we’ve probably all heard about the importance of body language. From a player’s perspective, its the subject of an article Karch Kiraly wrote a while back. Do you actually think about your posture, stance, movements, and facial expressions when you’re coaching, though?

I’m sure most of us don’t. We’re too caught up in the moment – in our coaching. It tends to only be when things are pointed out to us – as in Mick’s case – that we realize what we’re doing and the potential implications. That isn’t always something others will talk with us about, though. Mick is fortunate to have a wife who is willing to make those kind of statements. For those who don’t, it wouldn’t hurt to take things into our own hands by watching ourselves on video – or at least soliciting feedback from folks who will be honest with us.

If you’re someone who wants a long career in coaching, this sort of thing is important. You always have an audience. At the lower levels that may just be your players and their parents. If you coach for a school, add in spectators, teachers, students, and administrators. If you coach for a club, especially professionally, you have sponsors to consider. You’re bound to end up on a broadcast or a video at some point – maybe even every time you coach like those at the upper levels of NCAA and professional volleyball. That’s a lot of people making judgments about you based on what they see you doing or not doing.

In other words, it’s not just about how you present yourself to the players – which is important in its own right. It’s also how you present yourself to all sorts of others who can potentially influence your coaching career. As Mark recently asked, “What’s your message?

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Tom Tait

Father of the Penn State Volleyball Programs

In the 1970s Tom Tait, a professor of kineseology, took charge of both the men’s and women’s teams at Penn State. They were club programs at the time, but he eventually saw both elevated to full varsity status. After handing off the women’s team to Russ Rose, Tom carried on for several more years with the men before shifting is focus to coaching education.

His resume includes:

  • 6 NCAA tournament appearances, including a runner-up finish
  • 1986 Volleyball Monthly National Coach of the Year
  • 5 times Eastern Collegiate Coach of the Year
  • EIVA Coach Emeritus
  • Member of the inaugural AVCA Hall of Fame induction class

Here’s some of what Tom discusses in his interview:

– Learning from successful coaches

– The history and development of Penn State Volleyball

– Training attackers to hit with power

– The importance of understanding athlete movement

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Tom’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Mark Lebedew

From the Professional Coaching Trenches

Australian Mark Lebedew currently coaches in Poland for Jastrzębski Węgiel after a successful five years in Germany leading the Berlin Recycling Volleys club to new heights. He is also the author of the At Home on the Court blog.

His resume includes:

  • Coaching in the Olympics, the World League, and World Championship qualifications
  • Winning the German championship 3 times in a row
  • A CEV Champions League bronze medal
  • Experience coaching in Italy, Poland, Germany, and Belgium
  • Teaching around the world as an FIVB Coaching instructor

Here’s some of what Mark discusses in his interview:

– His philosophy on training

– How he prepares a team for a match

– The life of a professional volleyball coach

– How he uses video and statistics

– His philosophy on goal setting

– Advice for developing coaches

 

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Mark’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Sue Gozansky

One of the World’s Most Respected Coaching Educators

Coaches around the world know Sue Gozansky from her tireless efforts in coaching education and development. She is also author of well respected coaching books. All of this is built on a long, successful career coaching US collegiate volleyball and in a variety of international capacities.

Her resume includes:

  • Nearly 700 wins in 39 seasons coaching at UC Riverside.
  • 3 National Championships and a record 20 straight trips to the NCAA tournament.
  • Author of Championship Volleyball Techniques and Drills and Volleyball Coach’s Survival Guide
  • International coaching instructor for the FIVB and for USA Volleyball
  • AVCA Hall of Fame inductee

Here’s some of what Sue discusses in her interview:

– Developing the team concept and team-building

– Coaching career progression and growth

– Learning and sharing coaching knowledge

– Managing relationships with players

– Training planning and implementation

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Sue’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Jefferson Williams

Among the Winningest Coaches You’ll Find Anywhere

Transplant Jefferson Williams has amassed a ridiculous amount of silverware while coaching in his adopted country, England. He has also been involved in the English and Team GB programs in a number of different roles over the years, and is considered a mentor to many of the younger generation of U.K. coaches. All this while holding down a day job!

His resume includes:

  • Won 20 men’s national championships and 15 cup titles in England
  • Won 12 English women’s national championships and 11 cups.
  • Coached the English National Team 1987-2003
  • Additional professional coaching experience in Sweden

Here’s some of what Jefferson discusses in his interview:

– The challenges of being a player/coach

– Cultural differences

– Coaching in a place where volleyball is a minor sport

– Coaching education and development

– Working with male and female players

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Jefferson’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Mick Haley

Making Winning Championships a Habit

After enormous success at the Junior College level, Mick Haley became the first coach of a non-West Coast university to win an NCAA Division I National Championship when he did it at Texas. After coaching in the Olympics, he once more led a college team to the top while running the USC program.

His resume includes:

  • 2000 Olympics coach for the USA Women’s National Team
  • NCAA Division I National Championships with two different universities.
  • 6 Junior College National Championships
  • Well over 1000 career victories
  • Member of multiple coaching halls of fame.

Here’s some of what Mick discusses in his interview:

– Coach development and education

– Working with male vs female players

– When things aren’t as good as you’re used to

– Creating a volleyball powerhouse at Texas

– The influence of the international game on US coaching

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Mick’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.

 

Volleyball Coaching Wizard Carl McGown

Changing How Coaches Think About Training

When it comes to influence on volleyball coaching, few can match Carl McGown. His advocacy of training specificity, among other concepts, through his work with the USA National Team program and Gold Medal Squared has changed the thinking and training methods of many coaches all over the world.

His resume includes:

  • 4 decades of USA National Team coaching
  • 2 NCAA Men’s National Championships.
  • Swiss professional league and cup titles
  • AVCA Hall of Fame

Here’s some of what Carl discusses in his interview:

– Specificity and long-term athletic development

– The difference in performance between the US men and women

– Initial vs. final ability

Play this excerpt for a taste of the sort of insights and ideas you’ll get from the full interview:

Get access to Carl’s interview now for just a $14 contribution to the Volleyball Coaching Wizards project.










Note: PayPal is used to process the payment, but a PayPal account is not required.